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DIFFERENT PERCEPTIVE TOWARDS EARLY CHILDHOOD – ISRAELS WAY

DIFFERENT PERCEPTIVE TOWARDS EARLY CHILDHOOD – ISRAELS WAY

I received a mail from one of my friends. The email talked about the Entrepreneurship and startup. To my surprise, the highest rate is of Israel. The country with just 9 million people. What is done in that country that produces so many Entrepreneurs? Today we look around, the majority talk about best grades, jobs, job packages and job security. We, parents, are behind are kids for admission in top universities and institutes. The end result is a JOB.

While doing my research I found out few interesting facts. That keeps Israels ahead.

UNIQUE KINDERGARTEN APPROACH- In the year 1950, during that time the community called Sde Eliyahu did not have financial resource but were rich with ideology. MALKA HAAS young kindergarten teacher had the financial constraint in equipping the school with expensive, mass-produced toys. The creative solution she brought was she collected out-of-use tractors, ladders, beds, tires, barrels, old stoves, pans, teacups, fabrics, paint, paper, straw, and more. All actual things which were used by adults in real life. In this way, the junkyard concept was born

The junkyard concept, an entire educational philosophy grew: Playing with Junk. To this day, throughout Israel, you can find junkyards in daycare facilities, preschools and kindergartens. As MALKA HASS explains, it “ playing with junk is much more than just experimenting with materials. It involves the whole person: muscles and senses, emotion and intellect, individual growth and social interaction.”

Do Israeli children learn by playing with a broken computer’s hardware and discarded tracks? Playing in a junkyard helps build an impressive set of skills necessary for entrepreneurial endeavours: risk management, independence, conflict resolution, and teamwork, among others.

DIFFERENT PERCEPTIVE TOWARDS EARLY CHILDHOOD – ISRAELS WAY

Unlike with standard playing space where the purpose is defined by imitation of the real object. MALKA HASS says playing in a junkyard empowers the kids. Even in the formative age of 2 to 6 years, Israeli children are capable of transforming their environment.

They take tyers, plywood sheet, broken computers, metal barrels to build a house or castle out of it. Within this setting, each child has the opportunity to become a creative entrepreneur.

In my opinion, the junkyard is a highly risky place for the child to play. Children could fall, get hurt, dust, hygiene all are the area of concern for child health. It is a big liability.

ISRAELI PARENTS APPROACH TOWARDS JUNKYARDS- Parents believe their kids learn how to handle risk. They develop the abilities to be creative and independent. Yes, getting hurt while playing is an integral part of life. As an adult, we deal with all sort of risks. We learn the assess the risk and risk management.

Through practice, children learn to handle risks, to be careful, and to know the boundary between what is too dangerous and what is possible. Depositing our children’s’ safety in their own hands is the demonstration of trust they need from us, the adults.

DIFFERENT PERCEPTIVE TOWARDS EARLY CHILDHOOD – ISRAELS WAY

LESSONS I LEARNT: Israeli children are not taught to be entrepreneurs but, they are encouraged to develop skills that are often found among the successful entrepreneurs.

For childhood, an Israeli child learns safety is in his hands. They are responsible for their safety. For that their parents trust them. On the other hand, we are always behind our kids for his/her safety. The child doesn’t realize that his safety is in his hand. He feels it is parents responsibility.

Israeli Parents don’t bind the kids in age-appropriate activities. Rather leave them to explore the world around. Develop its own standards. We there find activities age-appropriate activities. Limiting the creative, imaginative, logical approach in a child.

Article by – Romal Surana
Source – www.israel21c.org

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